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FDA Challenged Over Metal Implants ‘Public Health Travesty’

Sasha Chavkin, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: November 14, 2019


Patients who suffered debilitating immune reactions after being implanted with metal-containing devices have joined doctors, scientists and industry representatives to testify before a United States government advisory panel probing the risks of immunological responses to metals placed inside the body.

The hearing represented the most systematic look by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at the issue of adverse reactions to metals, a problem that affects a minority of implant patients but one that can cause severe pain, neurological damage and cognitive impairments.

“I’m in a great deal of pain, so please bear with me,” testified Sue Francis, a hip implant patient who has experienced severe health effects stemming from her reaction to metal. “We need to recognize that these metals from day one are interacting with our bodies.”

Metals are a major component of common devices such as artificial hips, spinal fusion implants and the contraceptive coil Essure, but there is limited scientific research on auto-immune and allergic responses to them.

The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists reported extensively on hip implants and Essure as part of its global Implant Files investigation, which revealed massive gaps in medical device oversight that left patients vulnerable to flawed and poorly tested products.

Patients and their advocates urged the FDA to order more detailed disclosure of the metals used in devices, to require device labels to disclose the risks associated with metals, and to send a letter to doctors across the country alerting them to the threat of adverse metal reactions.

[…]

Unlike hearings earlier this year on breast implants and vaginal mesh that focused on specific products and regulatory steps, yesterday’s hearing focused on trying to understand and improve the state of scientific knowledge on metal reactions.

As such, it is unlikely to result in the short term in dramatic steps such as banning products from the market.

Experts urged the FDA to make the hearing the beginning of a sustained effort to gather data on the problem of metal reactions, including their differential effects among patients of different gender, age and socioeconomic status.

For example, the substantial majority of adverse responses to metal devices occur among women, who are generally more vulnerable to auto-immune, rheumatic and thyroid disorders.

“There’s a need for more and better pre-market research,” said Diana Zuckerman, the president of the National Center for Health Research. “We need to really have better data on diversity of patients.”

Read the original article here.

FDA Advisers Hear About Problems, Research Needs With Metal Implants

Mary Jo M. Dales, MedPage Today: November 14. 2019


Reports of adverse events related to metal-containing implants are on the rise. While still rare on a proportional basis, the numbers are increasing as the sheer volume of surgical implants has expanded, an FDA advisory committee was told Wednesday.

At the first day of a two-day meeting of the Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, members heard from experts that it isn’t easy to tease out which patients are likely to have an adverse event. While patients with a known metal allergy might be an obvious risk group, the ability to screen for these allergies is limited.

And while these devices each have a unique identifier, the metallic components within individual devices are seldom detailed in this labelling further limiting the patient’s ability to avoid a known metal allergy, based on public testimony given during the meeting. Over 50 registered speakers were granted speaking time at the two-day meeting.

In a discussion of an array of histologic, imaging, and serologic studies that might be useful for selected out patients at risk for metal-related adverse events, experts pointed out that these measures alone fell short. Abnormal test results do not reliably predict adverse events. Further, the combinations of tests that might be indicative would be prohibitively expensive to perform on a large population of patients to determine a small sub-population at risk.

As device implantation has grown in recent years, so have problems tied to them. In 2012, for instance, the FDA held a two-day advisory committee meeting to address failure rates and adverse effects from metal-on-metal hip implants. That led the agency a few months later to put restrictions on these products. Still, issues remain around management of patients who received them. And that’s just one type of metallic implant, of which there are hundreds if not thousands.

Earlier in 2019, the FDA announced efforts to further evaluate the safety of specific materials used in medical devices and how to better identify patients who might be at increased risk of experiencing a hypersensitivity response. The agency is accepting public comment on the issue until December 16.

[…]

In public testimony Wednesday, Karin Pacheco, MD, MSPH, an allergist at National Jewish Health and the University of Colorado in Denver, presented data on 1,500 patients with unexplained joint failure referred by their orthopedic surgeons who have ruled out infections and mechanical issues. The findings indicate that half of these patients are sensitized to something in the joint — about a quarter of them to the relevant metal in their implant, about 20% to bone cement, and a smaller proportion to both components.

Further, people with allergies and revised to another implant with different components do “extremely well,” she said. The implications are that sensitization to implant components is a cause of joint failure. “We think that nickel, cobalt and chromium, and maybe titanium, are the culprits, but we need more research.”

“If you have a history of skin reactivity [to device components], then you probably need to be tested” before receiving an implant, she said. Pacheco emphasized that over a million joint replacements are done each year in the U.S. and more of them are going to people ages 45-64.

Diana Zuckerman, PhD, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research, urged comparative effectiveness research.

“If certain implants seem to be causing certain reactions with certain kinds of patients, wouldn’t it be very important to know how that compares to other alternatives of the same kind of implants? We can’t treat all hip implants that are polyethylene and metal as if they’re all the same,” she said.

“We can’t treat all metal-on-metal implants as if they’re the same. We need to compare different models, different implants made in different ways with different materials by different companies and get some kind of real data” that patients and physicians can use to make informed decisions, Zuckerman added. Until then, figuring out how much is due to patient vulnerabilities and how much is the difference between various devices will remain challenging.

Several speakers detailed their personal experiences of adverse events, including neurologic and rheumatologic events that followed their receiving an implant. Linda Radach said she received a metal-on-metal hip implant requiring two subsequent revision surgeries, concluding, “The bottom line between all the harm is the materials. Go after that. Set rigid standards for biocompatibility testing.”

[…]

The Immunology Devices Panel will hear additional comments on Thursday, especially in regard to dental amalgam, and will respond to a series of questions posed by FDA staff.

Read the original story here.

When Recalls Fail: Many harmful products remain in homes and stores. Why that happens, what needs to change, and how to protect yourself.

Rachel Rabkin Peachman, Consumer Reports: October 31, 2019


Antibiotic-resistant strains of salmonella are linked to contaminated chicken, sickening many and hospitalizing more than 200 people for almost a year and a half, though it was known that the plants processing the chicken had failed federal food safety standards. Why did the outbreak go on for so long before the unsafe chicken was pulled from store shelves?

breast implant lacking premarket safety research is linked to a rare cancer, but years pass and women die before regulators acknowledge the connection and a manufacturer recalls the devices. Why did it take patient outcry before the potentially deadly implants were taken off the market?

An inclined sleeper for babies is put on the market without adequate safety testing or adherence to infant sleep guidelines. Over the next decade, as the sleeper becomes a best seller, dozens of babies die while using it. Why did it take public exposure before the manufacturer recalled the product?

In 21st century America, it’s easy to assume that the products we put on our plates, in our homes, and in our bodies are safe and effective. Many people expect that we have robust consumer protections in place—a system that vets products thoroughly before allowing them to be sold and that recalls products swiftly if they prove to be dangerous.

But product safety regulation and the recall process are part of a complicated and imperfect system that varies widely depending on the type of product, the industries involved, and the government agencies tasked with overseeing it. For instance, a recall does not get put into motion automatically when a product is known to cause harm. Recalls, if they happen at all, can take years to be initiated, often only after public protest and sometimes following injuries or deaths.

Moreover, when a recall is issued, consumers often aren’t made aware. Almost 70 percent of Americans said that they had not heard about a recall in the past five years for any product they own, according to a Consumer Reports nationally representative survey of 1,010 adults, though millions of products are recalled each year. And only 21 percent of Americans said they had heard about a recall and responded to it in that time frame. Of those, about two-thirds said the issue had to do with their car, 19 percent said it involved food, 9 percent a health product, and 9 percent a children’s product.

That disparity is not surprising, says David Friedman, CR’s vice president of advocacy and a former acting administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Unlike other federal agencies, NHTSA requires manufacturers to notify car owners directly about recalls. To track recalls, it helps that every car has a unique vehicle identification number and every owner has a registration. Other agencies—the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Agriculture, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission—generally have fewer tools and requirements for recalls. In some cases, laws can actually shield agencies from accountability and protect companies from liability, Friedman says.

Even when consumers learn about a recall, they often aren’t given simple, effective ways to respond. Some entail disassembling and mailing in part of the product for a refund, or not using the product until a replacement part is mailed—a process that can take months. As a result, many recalled products remain in use, risking further injury.

How, then, can consumers ensure that the products they buy have been safety tested and have not caused problems since their release? In some cases, it’s impossible to fully know. But the examples described here provide a sense of how regulatory oversight sometimes works for—and against—consumers. Plus, we share steps you can take to protect yourself and your family.

[…]

Dangerous Breast Implants

Raylene Hollrah was 33 years old in 2007 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. A year and a half later, when she was ready for reconstructive surgery, she chose a silicone-filled implant with a textured surface made by Allergan. Hollrah, from Hermann, Mo., believed a selling point of the implant was that she’d automatically be enrolled in a 10-year study “so I could help other women,” she says.

What Hollrah didn’t know is that medical devices—including breast implants, artificial joints, and pacemakers—are subject to much less rigorous premarket testing than drugs are. That’s partly because the FDA didn’t begin regulating medical devices or requiring research on their efficacy and safety until 1976, after many devices were already in use.

Silicone breast implants were introduced in the 1960s with little to no safety research, says Diana Zuckerman, Ph.D., president of the National Center for Health Research. Even after the FDA began regulating them, the agency didn’t require premarket studies until 1991—when it determined there was insufficient safety research, and soon after put a moratorium on sales.

In 2006, when the FDA did approve silicone implants, it was on the condition that manufacturers conduct post-market studies, one of which included Hollrah. But that wasn’t made clear to her early on. And as time passed, more problems emerged. In 2011, the FDA announced a link between silicone- and saline-filled implants and a form of cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).

But Hollrah didn’t learn about breast implant associated ALCL, or BIA-ALCL, until 2013, when one of her implants swelled and she tested positive. “I removed breast cancer,” Hollrah says, “and then I put something right back in my body that gave me cancer again.”

Around the time of Hollrah’s diagnosis, Allergan dropped her from its post-approval study. In fact, Allergan lost track of many participants, in part because it was difficult to follow up with the women, who were given no real incentives to stay involved in the studies, Zuckerman says. As a result, the research was never completed. Yet the FDA did not penalize manufacturers or recall the implants.

Fortunately for Hollrah, her cancer was caught early. She had her implants removed in 2013 and is now cancer-free.

But it wasn’t until July 2019 that the FDA announced the recall of Allergan’s textured implants due to a reported worldwide total of 573 BIA-ALCL cases, 481 of them from Allergan, including 33 deaths.

When asked why it took eight years after the FDA acknowledged the risk of BIA-ALCL for the agency to request a recall, an FDA spokesperson said it took the action after learning, in the spring of 2019, of “a significant increase in known cases of BIA-ALCL.”

Though the recall is a victory for women affected by BIA-ALCL, other concerns remain. For one, “when medical devices are recalled, there’s typically not a rigorous process to reclaim the flawed products,” says Lisa McGiffert, a co-founder of the Patient Safety Action Network and a former patient-safety expert at CR.

There’s also no established system for device manufacturers to find and notify doctors and patients about a recall. Hollrah notes that she has yet to receive a recall notification from Allergan.

For its part, Allergan says that “patient safety is a priority” and that it is committed to ensuring the safe and effective use of its products.

Still, hundreds of thousands of women are estimated to have a recalled device in their bodies and no easy choices. The FDA recommends implant removal only for women with a diagnosis of BIA-ALCL. But women don’t always have obvious symptoms. “Although BIA-ALCL is treatable if caught early, no one wants to wait to see if they get cancer,” says Sara Castro, an attorney at Farr law firm in Punta Gorda, Fla., who is working with affected women.

Another hurdle: Though Allergan will pay for replacement implants in the case of a cancer diagnosis or implant defect, it doesn’t cover the surgical costs of preventive implant removal. Most insurers won’t cover it, either.

Scot Glasberg, M.D., past president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and a consultant for Allergan, says that “if a woman has any concerns whatsoever, she should see a plastic surgeon who is board certified,” specializes in breast implants, and is knowledgeable about BIA-ALCL to go over her screening and testing options.

Women considering breast-implant surgery (or any medical device procedure) should ask their surgeon for an informed consent form that details what the device contains, and known risks. “This form is not mandated yet,” says Hollrah, who did not have that protection before her surgery and has since worked with Zuckerman, Glasberg, and others to develop a patient form and clearer warnings. And they have made progress on that front: On October 24, 2019, the FDA recommended that patient labeling for breast implants include a patient decision checklist, a boxed warning, an information booklet, and a patient device card. A final decision on that recommendation isn’t expected until 2020 at the earliest. 

Madris Tomes, a former program manager at the FDA who now runs Device Events—which gathers adverse event reports on medical devices—recommends researching your device. One free source is an online FDA database called MAUDE (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience). “Two-thirds of all recalls begin as an adverse event report,” Tomes says.

[…]
Read the original article here.

FDA calls for new warnings for breast implants

Laurie McGinley, The Washington Post: October 23, 2019.


The Food and Drug Administration, under fire from women who say they were harmed by breast implants, proposed on Wednesday that manufacturers detail possible complications from the devices, including rare cancers, a range of other symptoms and the need for additional surgeries.

The agency recommended that manufacturers use a boxed warning — the FDA’s strictest caution — to clearly spell out the risks of implants, including that they are not lifetime devices and that the chances of complications increase over time. The warning also would list the devices’ association with a rare form of lymphoma and say some patients have reported fatigue, muscle aches and joint pain.

The agency also proposed that patients be given a checklist to guide conversations with their surgeons about the risks and benefits of implants before women put down deposits for their surgeries. The move is a response to complaints from patients who said they weren’t adequately told about potential problems before surgery.

“We have heard from many women that they are not fully informed of the risks when considering breast implants,” FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy and Jeff Shuren, director of the agency’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement. The new recommendations are “designed to help inform conversations between patients and health care professionals when breast implants are being considered,” they added.

The FDA’s steps are the latest effort to deal with reports of complications involving devices that have been at the center of sometimes angry debate and legal actions for decades. The devices are used in about 400,000 surgeries in the United States every year, with 75 percent of the women involved getting implants for cosmetic reasons. Most of the rest get them as part of reconstruction after surgery for breast cancer.

Over the past few years, patients who say they were harmed by the devices have become increasingly active on social media sites that have enabled tens of thousands of patients to exchange information. The emergence of a rare cancer linked to implants in recent years also has drawn more attention to potential health problems associated with implants.

The FDA has said that 573 cases worldwide have linked the implants to a rare cancer since the agency began tracking the issue in 2011. The vast majority of those cases involved Allergan textured implants, which have been recalled. Thirty-three women have died of what’s known as breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, the agency said. At the same time, thousands of women have complained of fatigue, brain fog and other problems that collectively are called “breast implant illness.”

Nicole Daruda, an activist from Vancouver, Canada, who runs one of the most popular websites for women who have had trouble with implants, welcomed the FDA’s announcement, but said it was long overdue. “This is what needs to happen,” said Daruda, who had her implants removed after experiencing several health problems. “But I don’t think it would have without our putting intense pressure” on the agency.

Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research who has been working on implant issues for 30 years, said the FDA’s moves are “very important.” But she expressed concern they might yet be weakened, and are not legally binding because they are in the form of “guidance” to the industry. Whether the implant makers actually follow the recommendations “depends on how much pressure the FDA puts on the manufacturers,” she said.

The FDA’s steps are the latest in the agency’s stepped-up scrutiny of the devices, which included a dramatic two-day hearing in March during which many women demanded the FDA take steps to ensure patients have more information about the devices. About the same time, Zuckerman and Scot Glasberg, a past president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, formed a working group that included activists to make recommendations to the FDA, including for a boxed warning and a patient checklist of possible problems.

What the FDA is proposing “is very close to what we gave them,” Glasberg said, adding that other groups also made suggestions to the agency.

More than 70,000 women also signed a petition asking the FDA to require a checklist. The FDA, in issuing its recommendations on Wednesday, asked for public comment for 60 days before finalizing the guidance.

Breast implants became available in the United States in the 1960s. Three decades later, after years of reports about ruptured devices and possible links to autoimmune diseases, the FDA called for a moratorium on their use, saying manufacturers had not proved the devices’ safety and effectiveness. The devices were available only for cancer patients who were undergoing reconstructive procedures, and even then, only as part of a clinical trial. In 2006, the agency lifted the ban, approving two new silicone implants.

In 2011, the FDA issued a safety communication saying that women with breast implants might have a small increased risk of developing the rare lymphoma. In July, the implant maker Allergan announced a worldwide recall of its Biocell textured breast implants after the FDA found a sharp increase in a rare cancer and deaths linked to the products and asked the company to withdraw them from the U.S. market.

The FDA, in its proposed guidance Wednesday, also called for new screening guidelines for possible ruptures, as well as a recommendation that manufacturers include product ingredient information in the devices’ labeling that is easy for patients to understand.

Read the original article here.

Women Should Be Warned of Breast Implant Hazards, F.D.A. Says

Roni Caryn Rabin, NY Times: October 23, 2019


Women considering surgery to receive breast implants should be warned of the risk of serious complications, including fatigue, joint pain and the possibility of a rare type of cancer, the Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday.

Agency officials are urging manufacturers to print a boxed warning on the packaging of the implants, and to provide a checklist spelling out the risks for patients considering surgery. It will be left to doctors to review those risks with women seeking breast implants.

The measures are not mandatory and are now open to public comment and industry input. But the recommendations reflect a growing acknowledgment at the agency that implants may cause more harm in women than previously known.

Several years ago, the agency linked implants to a rare form of immune system cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In July, at the request of the F.D.A., one manufacturer, Allergan, recalled textured breast implants linked to the cancer.

More recent studies have reported higher rates of autoimmune disease among women with breast implants. Advocates for women with these complications called the F.D.A.’s proposals on Monday “an important step,” but noted that the action is only a recommendation.

“What matters most is what happens next,” said Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research in Washington, who has analyzed breast implant studies and has been advising patients.

She said surgeons should be required to go over the checklist with prospective patients before they put down a deposit.

“If breast implants can cause cancer of the immune system, doesn’t it make sense they can cause other systemic problems of the immune system?” Dr. Zuckerman asked.

Millions of women have implants, silicone sacks filled with saltwater or silicone gel that are used to enlarge the breasts for cosmetic reasons or to rebuild them after a mastectomy for breast cancer.

Breast augmentation with implants is the most popular cosmetic surgical procedure. Some 313,000 augmentations were performed in 2018, a 4 percent increase over the number in 2017. Breast reconstruction after cancer surgery accounts for another 100,000 procedures.

But thousands of women with implants have reported developing debilitating illnesses, such as severe muscle and joint pain, weakness, cognitive difficulties and fatigue — a constellation of symptoms some experts call “breast implant illness.”

Some of the ailments are forms of connective tissue disease, which includes lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and other serious autoimmune conditions.

Dr. Zuckerman has found that most breast implant studies were carried out by manufacturers or plastic surgery associations and did not track long-term outcomes, or lost so many participants to follow-up that results were not meaningful.

The studies focused on well-defined illnesses, she said, ignoring debilitating symptoms that lacked specific diagnoses, and most were too small to detect rare diseases.

Earlier this year, the agency warned two implant manufacturers that they had failed to carry out adequate long-term safety studies of implants, which had been mandated as a condition of their approval.

The proposed checklist and boxed warning were developed in response to demands by patients who testified last March at an advisory panel meeting about illnesses they blamed on their implants.

Dr. Diana Zuckerman’s Statement on FDA’s Draft Guidance on Labeling for Breast Implants


Statement of Dr. Diana Zuckerman, President, National Center for Health Research on October 23 Regarding FDA Labeling Recommendations to Improve Patient Communication Draft Guidance

We thank the FDA for proposing a black box warning and a patient Informed Consent check list that provides specific, understandable information about the risks of breast implants.  The FDA’s draft includes the types of information that we have proposed to the FDA in recent months in our work with patient advocates and plastic surgeons.  The devil is in the details, so we look forward to working with the FDA to finalize these materials so that patients can make better informed decisions in the future than most women considering breast implants have been able to make. We will  keep working closely with the FDA, patients, and plastic surgeons to make that goal a reality.

For more information see FDA’s Draft Guidance here.

Breast implants, heavy metals & autoimmune disorders: What should be in FDA warnings?

Kris Pickel, AZ Family: October 18, 2019


As the Food and Drug Administration considers issuing stronger warnings for breast implants, there is a debate brewing over the content of those warnings.

The FDA is looking at several options.

• A checklist of possible risks. Doctors would be required to go over the checklist with patients who are considering breast implants.

• Listing the ingredients in breast implants.

• A box warning, also known as a black box warning. It’s the strongest warning the FDA issues signifying there is a risk of serious or even life-threatening adverse effects.

The FDA recently updated its websiteacknowledging what has become known as breast implant illness.

“Some breast implant patients report a variety of systemic symptoms, such as chronic fatigue, brain fog, joint and muscle pain, which may not meet the diagnostic criteria to be categorized as a disease. Patients refer to these symptoms collectively as ‘breast implant illness (BII).’ In some cases, patients report that removal of their breast implants without replacement appears to reverse their symptoms.”

The regulatory agency is reacting to pressure from a growing movement by tens of thousands of women who believe breast implants made them sick. They describe many more symptoms than what the FDA recognized.

BII is not a new problem

Women have expressed concerns about breast implants for decades. Many women say doctors discount any connection the implants and the issues they experience, often making them feel their illness and symptoms are psychosomatic.

Nicole Daruda is one of the key figures behind the growing number of women demanding stronger warnings.

With recent attention on symptoms and illnesses potentially caused by breast implants, hundreds of women are requesting to join her Facebook groupBreast Implant Illness and Healing by Nicole, every day.

Five years after getting implants, Daruda was too sick to work.

She says at that time, there was almost no information available on a possible link between breast implants and the often-debilitating symptoms that plague some women.

“I put the words together, ‘breast implant illness,’ because I didn’t know what else to call it,” Daruda said.

n March, the FDA held public meetings on the safety of breast implants.

Women showed up from across the country, demanding stronger warnings that list the chemicals and heavy metals contained in breast implants. And they don’t just want the cautions to come from the FDA. They believe the caveats should come from breast implant manufacturers, too.

When Daruda had her implants removed, she described them as “sticky,” with silicone coming through the shell. It’s a condition known as “gel bleed.”

While the FDA acknowledges that gel bleed happens, it does not list it as a known risk or complication of breast implants.

“I lost over a decade of my life and health to breast implants,” Daruda said. “After my explant, it took me four years to recover the better part of my health. I still have permanent damage to my kidney from heavy metal.”

[…]

An estimated 35 million women have breast implants. Many of them never reported negative health effects.

Cohen Tervaert says certain factors can increase a woman’s risk of having an adverse reaction to implants. Those factors include allergies (any type from hay fever to metal allergies), an autoimmune disease, and a family history of autoimmune diseases.

Large-scale studies need to be done, according to Cohen Tervaert, but how they are done needs to change.

After his presentation to the FDA, the agency asked registries that collect data on patients and the safety and performance of breast implants to start tracking information on autoimmune diseases.

While many health professionals and implant manufacturers are quick to note that the safety of breast implants has been studied extensively, Dr. Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research and an expert on national health policy, says women cannot make informed decisions based on those studies.

The former senior policy advisor to the White House was vital in helping women with breast implant illness to organize and work with the FDA to secure the public meetings on breast implant safety.

“There are hundreds of studies of breast implants published in the last few decades, but almost all are so biased that they are fatally flawed,” she explained. “Almost all were paid for by the companies that make breast implants or the doctors whose salaries depend on those surgeries. The researchers asked the wrong questions and studied implants in ways that didn’t make sense. For example, they studied too few women, studied women with implants for a short period of time, and didn’t study the debilitating symptoms that women said they were experiencing. They also tended to study women with any kind of breast implants, instead of studying whether some breast implants were safer than others. And because of who was paying for the studies, even when the researchers found that implants caused medical problems, those findings were often misrepresented or completely covered up.”

When it comes to proving cause and effect between breast implants and illnesses, Cohen Tervaert believes the evidence is there.

Citing laboratory studies, he says mice prone to autoimmune diseases like lupus or arthritis developed the conditions after the implants were introduced. At the same time, mice that showed no prior sensitivity to autoimmune diseases did not develop health problems with the implants.

Another finding is that more protracted illness appears to result in more difficult recoveries.

“Proof that we have is, that if you remove the breast implant, breast implant illness can be reversible, especially if the period between implementation and explantation is very short,” Cohen Tervaert said. “You see, quite often, complete recovery of the symptoms.”

“If it’s, however, longer, than there is only partial recovery,” he continued. “And if you have developed an autoimmune disease, those autoimmune diseases can be difficult to treat until you remove the breast implants.”

A 2017 study found silicone from breast implants can migrate throughout a woman’s body — even if the implant was not ruptured — because silicone can “bleed” through the shell.

Silicone has been found not just in the tissue around the implants, but also in various organs throughout the body, including the central nervous system and brain.

Women studied had symptoms ranging from fatigue and cognitive impairment to headaches and body pain. The study found 60% to 80% of patients showed health improvements after their implants were removed.

The FDA has not decided if it will impose stricter guidelines on breast implant studies.

The agency issued warning letters to implant makers Mentor and Sientra in March, citing “low recruitment, poor data, and low follow-up rates in their required post-approval studies.”

The FDA gave the manufacturers a two-week deadline to fix the issues. Seven months later, no action has been taken against the manufacturers.

An FDA spokesperson tells CBS 5 Investigates they will not speculate on possible punitive actions.

Also in March, the FDA announced that it would hold future meetings to discusses material used in medical devices, including breast implants. They say they will focus on why some people have adverse reactions while others do not.

“The vast majority of patients implanted with medical devices have no adverse reactions,” the FDA said. “The device works and performs as expected to treat medical conditions or help patients better manage their health. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that a small number of patients may have biological responses to certain types of materials in implantable or insertable devices. For example, they develop inflammatory reactions and tissue changes, causing pain and other symptoms that may interfere with their quality of life.”

A date for the meeting has not been set.

Read the original story here.

Some textured implants have a cancer risk. Here’s why women are told not to remove them

Joce Sterman and Alex Brauer, WJLA: September 16, 2019.


WASHINGTON (SBG) – We’ve all heard of recalls on cars and dangerous toys, but a global recall of a device that’s surgically implanted inside your body has thousands of women on alert. The recall of Allergan’s textured BIOCELL breast implants was prompted by a government analysis that showed an increased risk of cancer. Still, women who have them are generally being told not to have them removed from their chests.

For the last two months, Raylene Hollrah’s email and phone have been blowing up, with hundreds of women contacting her non-profit, dedicated to raising awareness about the emerging cancer. It’s called Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma, also known as BIA-ALCL.

The fear women are dealing with comes following the August global recall of Allergan’s BIOCELL textured implants due to the increased the risk of lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system that Raylene now knows all too well.

When she was diagnosed with BIA-ALCL in 2013, it was a brutal double whammy. Hollrah had survived breast cancer and a mastectomy. During reconstructive surgery in 2008, she got the textured implants that eventually gave her cancer a second time, making her just the 25th documented case of BIA-ALCL in the United States at that time. Her treatment and the research that preceded it came courtesy of Dr. Mark Clemens, who is a pioneer when it comes to researching the disease at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas.

In 2017, our Sinclair station in Washington, WJLA/ABC7 was one of the first in the country to tell Raylene’s story and highlight the link between textured breast implants and lymphoma. In that report, reporter Kimberly Suiters pointed out the Food and Drug Administration was aware of 258 confirmed cases of BIA-ALCL. But she said the warnings were not making it to women who might be at risk.

When she was diagnosed with BIA-ALCL in 2013, it was a brutal double whammy. Hollrah had survived breast cancer and a mastectomy. During reconstructive surgery in 2008, she got the textured implants that eventually gave her cancer a second time, making her just the 25th documented case of BIA-ALCL in the United States at that time. Her treatment and the research that preceded it came courtesy of Dr. Mark Clemens, who is a pioneer when it comes to researching the disease at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas.

In 2017, our Sinclair station in Washington, WJLA/ABC7 was one of the first in the country to tell Raylene’s story and highlight the link between textured breast implants and lymphoma. In that report, reporter Kimberly Suiters pointed out the Food and Drug Administration was aware of 258 confirmed cases of BIA-ALCL. But she said the warnings were not making it to women who might be at risk.

Allergan voluntarily pulled the implants as well as its related tissue expanders from the market, but they remain in thousands of women, many of them breast cancer survivors. And while a letter obtained by Spotlight on America shows the company is offering free replacement implants, it won’t pay for revision surgery.

The letter explains the decision not to cover surgical fees is in line with an FDA recommendation that textured implants not be removed in patients who have shown no symptoms of BIA-ALCL. The FDA is telling doctors to stop using the implants but has told women they can keep the implants if they’re not symptomatic.

Diana Zuckerman with the National Center for Health Research says, “Some of the women are going to say I don’t care what the FDA says, I’m getting them out.”

Zuckerman explained the FDA’s advice to keep the implants balances the risks of surgery with the chances of getting this type of lymphoma, which is rare. BIA-ALCL is also highly treatable and Zuckerman says removing the implants before a woman is diagnosed with BIA-ALCL is not a 100% guarantee that she won’t develop the disease.

And there’s another big question following the recall: exactly who has these implants? Zuckerman says many women don’t know and may struggle to find out as doctors don’t have to keep these records permanently.

That’s a big deal considering it could take years for this kind of cancer to develop. For Raylene Hollrah, her BIA-ALCL diagnosis came five years after she had her implants placed. After cancer a second time, she had them removed permanently. Now Hollrah has become an advocate for women in this same situation, making sure they know about BIA-ALCL.

So far no one has firmly pinpointed why these implants are a cancer risk, although many theories exist. And while the recall right now is only for Allergan’s BIOCELL textured implants, the FDA said it, “will continue to evaluate any new information and may, as a result, take action regarding other breast implants, if warranted.”

[…]

Read the full article here.

Yvette M.


My name is Yvette Melby and I am a Breast Implant Illness survivor.

I first got breast implants in May 2005.  By the beginning of 2006, my symptoms were debilitating and incapacitating. I had chronic neck, shoulder and back pain.  Other symptoms were joint and muscle pain, flu-like symptoms lasting only 24 hours at a time (weirdest feeling ever), brain fog, Raynaud’s disease, allergies (I had never been allergic to anything before), chronic fatigue, chronic migraines, numbness in my feet, very cold hands and feet, heart palpitations, severe chest pain going towards my back, metal taste, hair loss, body aches, and more.  As a woman who focuses on eating healthy and exercising regularly, my friends and family said I was the sickest, healthiest person they knew.

In June 2016, I had surgery to replace my saline implants with silicone gel implants. Shortly after, I began to experience hardening of my right breast with severe pain behind my implant.  At 8 weeks post-op, I had a Grade II/III capsular contracture and an array of other physical symptoms.

I went to several doctors, had many diagnostic tests, and failed various types of physical therapy.  My doctors just kept referring me to other specialists because they could not give me a specific diagnosis and did not know why I was in so much pain. Having no answers from medical professionals made me feel depressed and weary. It knew it was NOT in my head. It was very real. My medical background and having medical professionals in my family led me to take matters into my OWN HANDS.

Immediately, I stopped researching my symptoms.  Instead, I googled “breast implant removal” and what I discovered was a procedure called “Explant” and Breast Implant Illness. What was this all about? My journey continued.

I felt like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders as I connected the dots of my symptoms to my implants. Next, I found a website called center4research.org which has extensive information about this illness and a list of symptoms associated with breast implant illness.  Also, on another website called healingbreastimplantillness.com, I found a list of explant surgeons and after interviewing several of them, I booked my surgery with a surgeon that was skilled in performing proper Explant Surgery.

Before booking my surgery, I was very grateful to find several Breast Implant Illness Facebook groups that confirmed through other women’s stories that I had Breast Implant Illness.  What a consolation this was during such a difficult time.  This is real and I am not crazy if thousands of women from all over the country from all walks of life with similar symptoms/stories get explant and feel better. So, I realized there was more to it and that most Plastic Surgeons do not recognize it.

I was lucky to find a surgeon who is calming and eases away your fears, embraces this illness, and believes there is a connection between all implants and BII, provides information on how to “explant,” and has a designated knowledgeable, experienced & professional explant concierge that you can trust and talk to about explant surgery and learn about Breast Implant Illness.

Truth be told, if it wasn’t for the pain in my right breast due to capsular contracture (hardening of the scar tissue around the implant), I would not have connected the dots that my breast implants were the cause of my debilitating symptoms for 12 years. My pain was so severe and systemic, I was bedridden sometimes for days.  I needed to learn more, so I began researching capsular contracture, and that’s when I found that the recurrence of getting it again is higher when you replace your implants.  That information, in addition to being sick, made me decide to remove my implants.  I choose my health over implants any day.  Many women are very sick for years because they believe replacement is the answer or just don’t want to part with their implants.

Bottom line, I knew my implants had to come out. The pain I was experiencing was not normal and after months of being deathly ill and seeing multiple doctors without any real diagnosis or explanation for all my symptoms and pain…I was DONE.

Pain is your body telling you something is wrong. Pain is NOT a normal symptom. The warrior in me suggests that you do not give up until you find the answer to your pain.

Thank goodness for the internet and my persistent research which led me to discover Breast Implant Illness. I am especially grateful to the National Center for Health Research and their website and research on breast Implants. The knowledge I gained on this site was invaluable to what led me to my ultimate decision to explant. After much research, I went with my gut instinct that it was my breast implants that were making me sick.  Unfortunately, the majority of the medical community do not believe that, due to lack of good safety data, and currently Breast Implant Illness is not recognized by the FDA.

I had Explant Surgery on April 13, 2017!  What I call, a “life-changing” surgery. All those terrible, debilitating symptoms were gone almost instantly!  I have not had one migraine since my explant surgery.  I can now breathe deep and my joint pain is almost non-existent. Explant is the first step to regaining your health. It is life-changing and healing after explant surgery is possible. It can take months even years to heal so listen to your gut instinct and pay attention to your body.

My experience led me to educate women about Breast Implant Illness and healing post explant. There is life after explant. You can regain your health. I believe in myself again and have regained my health!  I am so thankful that I trusted my instincts and listened to my body. Now, I am living my best life once again.

Thank you for reading my story.

How Safe Are Breast Implants, Really?

Rebecca Nelson, Elemental by Medium: September 3, 2019.


When Jamee Cook got breast implants at 21, she hoped to feel more confident about her body. Instead, the implants nearly ruined her life.

Just three years after her surgery, Cook, who is now 42, started having a slew of medical problems: fatigue, fevers, sinus infections, memory problems, and trouble concentrating. She felt like she constantly had the flu and could barely muster the energy to take care of her three kids. Because of her health problems, she had to quit her job as a paramedic. Four years ago, she finally saved up enough money to get her implants removed due to the complications and discovered her symptoms subsided. “I felt like I did a turnaround,” she says. She had finally gotten her life back.

Cook is not an outlier among women with breast implants. The safety of breast implants has long been a topic of debate in the medical community. After a safety scare in the 1990s, silicone implants were banned for more than a decade before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed them back on the market in 2006. But a growing body of evidence suggests that these newer breast implants aren’t as safe as this generation of women has been led to believe. The FDA requested in July that the implant manufacturer Allergan recall their textured implants, citing a link to a rare cancer called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. And an online movement of thousands of women who say their implants have made them sick is calling more attention to other long-term complications.

Breast implants first came on the market in the U.S. in the 1960s. They are classified as medical devices by the FDA and an estimated 10 million women around the world have them currently. While the vast majority of those women don’t have issues, there’s increasing evidence that implants are associated with serious risks. But the available data on their safety is of poor quality, and doctors, researchers, and patients disagree about what some of the risks actually are — making it all the more difficult for women to determine them before making a decision.

The medical community has long downplayed the potential complications of implants, says Diana Zuckerman, the president of the National Center for Health Research in Washington, D.C., who has studied implants. “There are many, many plastic surgeons whose entire livelihood depends on doing breast augmentation surgery. If they were to tell every patient what all the risks are, they’d have fewer patients.”

Here’s what’s known for sure: Nearly 600 cases of breast implant-related anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, have been reported to the FDA. As of July, 33 people died from it. Textured implants made by Allergan were linked to the cancer, and recalled globally that month. While the FDA says there’s generally a low risk of people with breast implants developing cancer from them, the agency said in a statement at the time that “we believe all individuals who are considering a breast implant of any type be informed of the risk.”

“Of the millions of women with breast implants, we know that complications occur in at least 1% of patients,” says FDA spokeswoman Stephanie Caccomo. “We believe, though, that all women should be aware of the potential risks and complications of breast implants, which are not lifetime devices.”

People who consider implants may be unaware that they are viewed as temporary devices to be removed or replaced at a later date. According to the FDA, the longer people have the implants, the higher their risk for complications. “The life of breast implants varies by person and can’t be predicted,” reads a FAQ about breast implants on the agency’s website. “That means everyone with breast implants will face additional surgeries — but no one can tell them when. And while a few people may keep their original implants for 20 to 30 years, that is not the common experience.”

[…]

Read the full story here.