Why Are Celebrities Removing Their Breast Implants?

 


Celebrities who removed their breast implants

Have you noticed how many celebrities are in the news announcing their decisions to remove their breast implants?  They usually talk about the importance of loving yourself the way you are and they often post Instagram pictures of “the new me.”

But most of these women aren’t just talking about body image — they are getting their implants removed because of their health. Breast implants can make some women so sick that removal is their best hope for feeling like themselves again.  Several celebrities are trying to share their experiences in order to help other women.

crystal_hefner_2014Crystal Hefner, Hugh Hefner’s wife, opened up about her breast implant horror story on Facebook. She announced her implants had been slowly poisoning her and causing unexplained back pain, cognitive problems, constant neck and shoulder pain, frequent infections, and many other symptoms. After removing her breast implants, she instantly felt an improvement and continues to feel better. Read more about her story here.

Yolanda Foster, of Real Housewives fame, removed her breast implants when she found out her silicone implants had ruptured and were leaking into her body. The silicone was making the symptoms of her Lyme disease even worse. She felt much better once she removed her implants.

Linda Blair, actress in the horror movie The Exorcist, described her experience with breast implants as a nightmare. After removing her implants, she advocated for the FDA to make sure breast implants are actually studied to be safe.

Mary McDonough, a child star in The Waltons who appeared as an adult in shows such as ER and Will and Grace, attributes her autoimmune disease (lupus) to her breast implants. She was healthy before getting implants, and it was only after her implants were removed that she immediately started to feel better. She has been one of the most outspoken celebrities on the risks of breast implants.

Karen McDougal is a former Playboy Playmate and now a model who had her implants removed after months of feeling sick. She has spoken out about the risks of breast implants in USA Today and People Magazine. This was well before she became known for her relationship with Donald Trump.

Stevie Nicks, the singer/songwriter and former lead singer of Fleetwood Mac, decided to have her implants removed because she believed they were causing extreme fatigue and lethargy.  After removal, Nicks told People Magazine “I’m living proof they aren’t safe. It turned out they were totally broken.”

Nicola Robinson, the Australian model and wife of prominent chef Pete Evans, decided to have her implants removed because she was so ill. Robinson told Australian TV show Sunday Night that “I knew 100 percent that they were making me sick and essentially ageing me. So it just made perfect sense to me that they had to go. There’s just so many advantages to not having two large bags attached to your chest.”

Melissa Gilbert, actress and producer, decided to have her implants removed fearing they would rupture. She told People Magazine, “What am I going to do when I’m in my 80s and I have to have a hip replacement but I also have my breast implants replaced? Because it’s inevitable, they have a life span. So I wanted them out.”

Mariel Hemingway, Kimberly Holland, and Heather Morris are among other celebrities who chose to remove their breast implants because of serious health problems.

Celebrities are bringing attention to the health problems that thousands of women with implants have suffered from for decades.

So, what usually goes wrong?

You can learn more about the risks and complications associated with breast implants here.

Besides health problems, some celebrities decide to remove their implants simply because they were annoying or embarrassing. Just to name a few, Heather Morris, Heidi Montag, Pamela Anderson, and Victoria Beckham all removed their implants for this reason.

If you’re considering getting breast implants, click here for more information.

If you’re considering removing your implants, click here for more information.

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[1] FDA Update on the Safety of Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants. Center for Devices and Radiological Health U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Page 7. June 2011

[2] Important Information for Augmentation Patients About Mentor MemoryGel™ Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants, Mentor. (FDA Patient Brochure) November 2006. Pages 25-27. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cdrh_docs/pdf3/p030053d.pdf

[3] Making An Informed Decision Saline-Filled Breast Implant Surgery, Inamed. 2004 Update. Pages 24, 32. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/implantsandprosthetics/breastimplants/ucm064457.pdf

[4] Miranda et al. Breast Implant–Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: Long-Term Follow-Up of 60 Patients. Journal of Clinical Oncology. Volume 32, Number 2. January 10 2014.

[5]  Brown SL, Pennello G, Berg WA, et al. Silicone Gel Breast Implant Rupture, Extracapsular Silicone, and Health Status in a Population of Women. J Rheumatology. 2001; 28:996-1003.

[6] de Boer M, Colaris M, van der Hulst RRWJ, Cohen Tervaert JW. Is explantation of silicone breast implants useful in patients with complaints? Immunologic Research. July 2016 DOI: 10.1007/s12026-016-8813-y\