Summaries of Implant Studies by Other Researchers


  • Patient Satisfaction After Breast Reconstruction with Implants Compared to Flap Procedures A 2018 study by Katherine Santosa and her colleagues found that patients who undergo autologous breast reconstruction (also called “flap” procedures), are generally more satisfied in the long-term than women who choose reconstruction with breast implants. 
  • MD Anderson Physicians Find Increase in Rare Diseases Among Women with Breast Implants Researchers at the MD Anderson Cancer Center studied nearly 100,000 women with breast implants and found higher rates of rare diseases among women with silicone breast implants.
  • Cancer of the Immune System (ALCL) and Breast Implants: Plastic Surgeons Study 173 Women In 2015, plastic surgeons who have been well known for defending the safety of breast implants published a study of 173 women with cancer of the immune system caused by breast implants. The study was paid for by a plastic surgery medical association and written by plastic surgeons who have defended the safety of breast implants for decades.
  • Women with Silicone Breast Implants and Unexplained Symptoms A study published in 2013 sheds light on the signs and symptoms that many women with silicone implants experience, and suggests that removing the implants can improve the women’s health dramatically.
  • Breast Cancer Detection and Survival Among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants According to a new research study published in the British Medical Journal, women with cosmetic breast implants who are diagnosed with breast cancer, are more likely to die from the disease compared to women without breast implants who are diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • What Do Women Need to Know and When Do They Need to Know It? When a woman decides whether or not to get breast implants, she must consider how that decision will affect her life. In this article, Drs. Susan Wood and Scott Spear discuss the known and unknown risks involved in breast implants.
  • Canadian Study Confirms Women with Breast Implants Require Greater Medical Care A 2003 study by the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s health found that women with breast implants had more doctors’ visits and were more than 4 times as likely to be hospitalized compared to women without breast implants. The study also found that 51% of participants with breast implants reported at least one additional breast-implant related surgery after the initial implantation. 
  • Where There’s Smoke, There’s Fire: The Silicone Breast Implant Controversy It’s time to end the burning disagreements over silicone breast implants. Nevertheless, we believe the significant problems of eventual undetected silicone envelope rupture and risk of systemic symptoms should dictate removal of silicone gel-filled breast implants from the market as too dangerous for human use.
  • An Association of Silicone-gel Breast Implant Rupture and Fibromyalgia In 2002, researchers at the FDA found that women with ruptured implants who had silicone gel migrate outside the scar tissue capsule were 2.7 times more likely to report fibromyalgia symptoms. The researchers also analyzed several other studies, which concluded that nearly 55% of breast implant patients with symptoms, had fibromyalgia.
  • Epidemiology of Silicone-Gel Breast Implants Silicone breast implants have been marketed in the United States since 1963. Questions remain unanswered on the safety of these medical devices despite their popularity and availability. The current review provides a brief discussion of the regulatory history of silicone implants and of FDA concerns over breast implants, implant prevalence, studies of systemic and local complications related to breast implants, and a brief description of the FDA study of silicone-gel breast implant rupture.
  • Cancer Risk at Sites Other Than the Breast Following Augmentation Mammoplasty In 2001, researchers found that women with breast implants had double or triple the expected rates of leukemia and cancers of the stomach, cervix, vulva, and brain.
  • Study of Silicone Breast Implant Rupture, Extracapsular Silicone, and Health Status in a Population of Women The first study to systematically evaluate the health of women with ruptured breast implants has raised serious concerns about silicone implants. FDA researchers found that women whose ruptured breast implants leaked silicone outside the scar tissue surrounding the implant were significantly more likely to have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, pulmonary fibrosis, and connective-tissue diseases such as dermatomyositis.
  • Government Study Links Breast Implants to Cancer, Lung Diseases, and Suicide A new study raises questions about the long-term safety of breast implants. FDA researchers found that women with breast implants are more likely to die from brain tumors, lung cancer, other respiratory diseases, and suicide compared to other plastic surgery patients.
  • Prevalence of Rupture in Patients with Silicone Breast Implants While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned consumers that “breast implants do not last a lifetime,” new FDA studies by Dr. Lori Brown and her colleagues indicate that most women with silicone gel-filled breast implants will have at least one broken implant within 10 years.
  • Institute of Medicine Report on Breast Implants The Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences produced a report in 1999 on the safety of silicone breast implants. The report did not involve any new research; instead, it was a summary and review of the existing scientific literature on silicone breast implants. The report was also limited by the serious shortcomings of the research that it relied on for the report. Most of the research the report used had substantial flaws in their study design.